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Deputy's Safety Razor

PatentUS605274

InventionSafety-Razor

FiledTuesday, 11th May 1897

PublishedTuesday, 7th June 1898

InventorElijah E. Deputy

LanguageEnglish

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A PDF version of the original patent can be found here.

No. 605,274.Patented June 7, 1898.
United States Patent Office.

Elijah E. Deputy, of Milford, Delaware. Safety-Razor.
SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 605,274, dated June 7, 1898. Application filed May 11, 1897. Serial No. 636,063. (No model.)

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, Elijah E. Deputy, a citizen of the United States, residing at Milford, in the county of Kent and State of Delaware, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Safety-Razors, of which the following is a specification.

This invention relates to improvements in safety-razors.

The object of the present invention is to improve the construction of safety-razors and to provide a simple and comparatively inexpensive one designed for barbers and also personal use and adapted to enable a person to be rapidly shaved without liability of cutting the face.

A further object of the invention is to provide a guard which will compel the operator to hold the blade in proper position while shaving, and thereby increase the durability of the razor, and which will prevent a towel from coming in contact with the blade while wiping the razor.

A further object of the invention is to provide a safety-razor in which the blade may be strapped, honed, and wiped without removing it from its frame or support and which will enable all of the parts exposed to lather to be conveniently and thoroughly dried to prevent the razor from rusting.

The invention consists in the construction and novel combination and arrangement of parts, as hereinafter fully described, illustrated in the accompanying drawings, and pointed out in the claims hereto appended.

In the drawings, Figure 1 is a perspective view of a razor constructed in accordance with this invention and shown open. Fig. 2 is a perspective view of the blade and its supporting-frame, the casing being removed and the guard being in position. Fig. 3 is a longitudinal sectional view. Fig. 4 is a transverse sectional view.

Like numerals of reference designate corresponding parts in the several figures of the drawings.

1 designates a blade-supporting frame provided with a shank 2 of the usual configuration and consisting of a longitudinal back bar 3 and inner and outer arms 4, arranged at right angles to the back bar and forming a rectangular opening or space for the reception of an adjustable blade 5. The shank 2 is pivoted to a handle 6 of the ordinary construction, with the exception that the inner faces of the sides thereof are provided with recesses 7 to receive the parts of the safety-razor, as hereinafter described, the recessing being for the purpose of enlarging the space between the sides.

The blade 5, which is provided at its back with a threaded socket 8 and which may be of the ordinary construction, as illustrated in the accompanying drawings, or any other preferred form, is engaged by an adjusting-screw 9, which has its head countersunk in an opening of the back of the frame 1. A spring 10 is interposed between the back of the frame and the back of the blade, being secured in position by the adjusting-screw, which passes through a perforation of it, and it is adapted to force the blade outward as the screw is rotated. The spring is centrally bowed and has its ends bent or curved, as shown, and the screw also acts as a pivot to enable the blade, when a casing 11 is removed, to be rotated partially to carry its ends outside of the frame 1, so that the parts may be thoroughly dried to prevent rusting.

The cutting edge of the blade extends beyond the arms 4, and a substantially rectangular guard 12 is mounted on the frame and has its outer portion arranged parallel with the edge of the blade to prevent the razor from cutting the face. The ends of the guard, which are arranged at right angles to the body portion, are located on the outer faces of the arms 4 and fit in tapering recesses 13 thereof and have their terminals bent inward at right angles to form pivots 14. The tapering recesses, which gradually increase in width toward the outer ends of the arms, permit the guard to have a limited lateral swing sufficient to permit the hair to get between it and the edge of the blade, and it is automatic in its operation and adjusts itself to the face when either side of the blade is against the same. The guard compels the razor to be used with the blade in proper position, as the latter cannot cut in any other position, and should the back of the razor be carried outward and the razor arranged at too great an «angle to the face the cutting edge of the blade is carried away from the face. This prevents the blade from scraping the face and unnecessarily wearing the edge and increases the durability of the razor, and the guard also prevents a towel from coming in contact with the cutting edge while wiping the razor.

The arms 4 taper toward their outer ends, and the back of the frame is enlarged and rounded, as shown. The casing 11, which is constructed of any suitable material, is tapering in cross-section and conforms to the configuration of the frame. The cutting edge of the blade projects beyond the side edges of the casing, which docs not have to be removed while strapping or honing a razor. By adjusting the screw more or less of the edge of the razor may be made to project beyond the shield to enable the razor to be adjusted for cutting light or heavy beards and also to advance it as it becomes worn.

The casing is inserted endwise on the frame and is provided at its back with longitudinal ribs 15, located at opposite sides of it and adapted to prevent the side faces of the casing from coming in contact with the stone while honing a razor, and the inner ends of the ribs may be beveled or tapered, as shown. The shank of the razor is enlarged to form shoulders 16 at opposite sides of the frame to provide abutments for the casing.

The rectangular guard is retained on the frame by its own resiliency, and it may be readily swung out of the recesses when it is desired to strap or hone the razor.

It will be seen that the safety-razor is simple and comparatively inexpensive in construction, that it prevents the face from being cut and is adapted for personal use or for barbers, and that the guard while shielding the face from the cutting edge also prevents a towel from coming in contact with the same when wiping the razor. It will also be apparent that the guard compels the razor to be held in proper position for cutting, and thereby prevents the blade from being unnecessarily worn and increases its durability.

What I claim is—

1. In a device of the class described, the combination of a blade-receiving frame provided with arms, an adjustable blade arranged within the frame and provided with a threaded socket, and a centrally-arranged adjusting-screw mounted on the frame and engaging the threaded socket, and forming a pivot for the blade, whereby the latter is adapted to be turned transversely of the frame, substantially as described.

2. In a device of the class described, the combination of a frame, an adjustable blade arranged therein and provided with a threaded socket, a spring interposed between the blade and the frame, and a screw mounted on the frame and engaging the threaded socket to adjust the blade, said screw retaining the spring in place and serving as a pivot for the blade, whereby the latter is adapted to be partially rotated, substantially as described.

3. In a device of the class described, the combination of a frame, a blade pivotally mounted in the frame and arranged to swing outward therefrom to expose the inner edges of the blade and the frame, whereby the parts may be thoroughly wiped and dried after use, and a removable casing covering the blade and the frame and locking the former in its operative position, substantially as described..

4. In a device of the class described, the combination of a frame having arms provided with tapering recesses, a blade mounted in the frame, and a guard extending in advance of the blade and pivoted in the said recesses, whereby it is permitted to swing laterally of the blade, substantially as and for the purpose described.

5. In a device of the class described, the combination of a frame provided at its ends with recesses, a blade arranged in the frame, and a substantially rectangular guard having its ends arranged in the said recesses and provided at their terminals with pivots to permit the guard to swing in the recesses, said guard being adapted to be sprung into and out of engagement with the recesses, substantially as described.

6. In a device of the class described, the combination of a substantially rectangular frame provided with a shank, an adjustable blade mounted in the frame, and a removable casing conforming to the configuration of the frame and provided at opposite sides with longitudinal ribs, substantially as described.

7. In a device of the class described, the combination of a frame having a shank, an adjustable blade mounted in the frame, a casing removably mounted on the frame and conforming to the configuration thereof, a detachable guard interlocked with the frame, and a handle pivoted to the shank and provided at the inner faces of its sides with recesses, substantially as and for the purpose described.

In testimony that I claim the foregoing as my own I have hereto affixed my signature in the presence of two witnesses.

Elijah E. Deputy.

Witnesses:

John H. Siggers,

Robert E. Crump.