zoom_out loupe Click on this icon or hold down the shift key to magnify while moving over the patent image. zoom_in
home Home help_outline Help
   
parts A d' B d C D F Fig1 Fig1 d D B C F d A E Fig2 Fig2 d C D a' B d' E A F Fig3 Fig3

The “Two-in-One” Razor

PatentUS819780

InventionSafety Razor

FiledFriday, 9th June 1905

PublishedTuesday, 8th May 1906

InventorWilliam J. Moore

LanguageEnglish

For a full resolution version of the images click here

A PDF version of the original patent can be found here.

United States Patent Office.

William J. Moore, of Washington, District of Columbia. Safety Razor.
No. 819,780. Specification of Letters Patent. Patented May 8, 1906.
Application filed June 9, 1905. Serial No. 264,529

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, William J. Moore, of Washington, in the District of Columbia, have invented a certain new and useful Improvement in Safety-Razors; and I do hereby declare that the following is a full, clear, and exact description thereof, reference being had to the accompanying drawings, in which—

Figure 1 is a perspective view of a razor embodying my invention. Fig. 2 is a plan view of Fig. 1. Fig. 3 is a central longitudinal sectional view of the razor illustrated in Fig. 1.

The object of my invention has been to provide a safety-razor which shall have the advantages of being exceedingly simple in construction and in operation, of permitting the blade to be removed and the holder cleaned with the greatest facility, and of permitting the blade to be readily adjusted relative to the holder; and to such ends my invention consists in the safety-razor hereinafter specified.

In carrying my invention into practice I provide a holder consisting of a bottom plate A, from the rear edge of which rises a plate B, that is preferably perpendicular to the bottom plate. A lip C extends forward from the vertical plate B over the bottom plate, the lip preferably occupying a position central between the ends of the plate. The razor-blade C—read D is thick at the rear edge and tapers toward the blade in the usual manner of hollow-ground razor-blades. At the back of the blade are preferably formed upper and lower edges d and d′. The blade lies between the plate A and the lip C and is clamped against the lip by a screw E on the upper end of the handle F, the screw being threaded through an opening a′ in a plate A beneath the lip C. As the blade is much thicker at its back than at its cutting edge, the upper corner or edge d at the back of the razor lies in a plane (when the cutting edge of the blade is in contact with the plate A) which is forward of the portion of the lower surface of the blade which is impinged upon by the screw, or more particularly the lower edge or corner d′ of the blade. The result of this relative location of the parts is that the blade becomes practically a lever tending to swing on the upper corner or edge d as a fulcrum, the screw tending to swing the lower edge or corner d′ rearward and upward on the said fulcrum, thus drawing the cutting edge of the blade firmly down upon the plate A. This action occurs whether the blade be shifted forward or back in the space beneath the lip C. The front edge of the plate A is preferably curved downward and is formed into a series of teeth in the usual manner. The described action of the screw in clamping the blade permits the blade to be adjusted forward or back relative to the guard formed by the teeth and yet insures that the blade will be held down against said teeth in any adjustment.

It will be observed that the construction and operation of my razor are of the greatest simplicity. To clamp or remove or adjust the blade, it is only necessary to give a partial turn to the handle relative to the holder. The only part projecting over the blade is the lip C, so that the entire cutting edge of the blade is available, and nothing comes in contact with such cutting edge, so that it is not liable to be injured. The blade can with the greatest facility be adjusted by hand forward or back relative ta the guard formed by the teeth, so as to make it cut more or less deeply.

It is obvious that changes can be made in the above-illustrated construction within the spirit of my invention.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim is—

1. In a safety-razor, the combination of a blade, a holder consisting of a base-plate forming a guard for the blade and a lip or projection extending over said blade, the blade having a lip-engaging edge or corner, and a clamping device that impinges on the side of the blade next the base-plate, at a point that rocks the blade on its lip-engaging edge or corner to press the cutting edge of the blade against the base-plate.

2. In a safety-razor, the combination of a blade, a holder consisting of a base-plate forming a guard for the blade and a lip or projection extending over the blade, the blade being thickened where it lies between said lip and said base-plate, and a screw engaging the thickened portion of the blade next the base-plate, the blade having an edge or corner that engages the lip at a point, between the cutting edge of the blade and the point of contact of the screw with the blade.

3. In a safety-razor, the combination of a blade, a holder consisting of a base-plate forming a guard for the blade and a lip or projection extending over said blade, the blade having a lip-engaging edge or corner, and a screw secured to or forming part of a handle passing through the base-plate and impinging upon the surface of the blade adjacent thereto at a point to cause the blade to rock or tilt on its lip-engaging edge or shoulder and press its cutting edge against the base-plate.

In testimony that I claim the foregoingI have hereunto set my hand.

William J. Moore.

Witnesses:

W. E. Wright,

E. J. Prindle.