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Arnold Fountain Safety Razor

PatentUS839447

InventionSafety-Razor

FiledThursday, 7th December 1905

PublishedTuesday, 25th December 1906

InventorFrederick Herbert Arnold

LanguageEnglish

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A PDF version of the original patent can be found here.

United States Patent Office.

Frederick H. Arnold, of Reading, Pennsylvania. Safety-Razor.
No. 839,447. Specification of Letters Patent. Patented Dec. 25, 1906.
Application filed December 7, 1905. Serial No. 290,701

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, Frederick H. Arnold, a citizen of the United States, residing at Reading, in the county of Berks and State of Pennsylvania, have invented new and useful Improvements in Safety-Razors, of which the following is a specification.

This invention relates to improvements in safety-razors; and the object is to provide a safety-razor of very simple construction and neat appearance.

The invention is intended as an improvement on the device shown and described in my pending application, Serial No. 275,514.

The invention is fully described in the following specification and clearly illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in which—

Figure 1 is a plan view of my razor. Fig. 2 is a longitudinal section on line X X, Fig. 1. Fig. 3 shows the side opposite that shown on Fig. 1. Fig.4 is an edge view. Fig. 5 shows the end of the guard in detail. Fig. 6 shows the blade in detail in two views. Fig. 7 is an enlarged cross-section on line A B, Fig. 3, looking in the direction of the arrow.

The numeral 1 designates the razor-blade, and 2 the holder. The entire device consists of these two pieces. The holder comprises a handle portion 3 and a guard portion 4. The guard is formed with the usual teeth 5 along either edge, and it has a transverse strip in the form of a binder 6, pressed upward or struck up from the body thereof near either end. These binders are formed with one or more approximately V-shaped grooves 7, extending across them on the under or inner side.

A slight indentation 8 is formed in the outer end of the guard beyond the binder 6. The blade 1 consists of a thin flexible steel plate of approximately the same thickness throughout, and it is preferably provided with two cutting edges and is formed with a slight extension 10 at one end. At the base of this extension is formed a slight lip 11, formed by pressing down a portion of the blade. The blade is also formed with one or more longitudinal corrugations 12, extending the entire length of the blade.

The blade is inserted in the holder by entering the one end thereof between the binder 6 and the guard-surface, the corrugations 12 entering the grooves 7 in the binders. When the blade has been forced into the holder sufficiently to have it engage both the binders 6, the lip 11 on the under side of the blade will snap into the depression 8 in the guard, and the blade will be firmly held in position.

The end 10 of the blade extends slightly beyond the edge of the guard, and to remove the blade this extension is raised slightly, disengaging the lip 11 from the depression 8, and the blade can be readily slid out of the guard.

The thin flexible blade is reinforced by the longitudinal corrugations 12, which are preferably formed at no great distance from the cutting edges and which prevent the blade from flexing or bending transversely of its length. These corrugations also constitute ribs which engage the grooves 7 in the binders 6, the latter thus serving to exert pressure to hold the blade in operative position flat upon the guard portion of the holder, sufficient pressure being exerted to retain the edges of the blade in proper contact with the guard portion.

What I claim is—

1. In a safety-razor, a holder having a guard portion provided with transversely-disposed binders spaced from the body thereof said binders having transversely-disposed grooves in their under sides, in combination with a thin flexible blade provided with longitudinal corrugations, said blade and corrugations engaging the body of the guard portion and the transverse grooves respectively.

2. In a safety-razor, a holder having a guard portion provided with binders at each end thereof, said binders being transversely disposed and raised from the surface of the guard portion for the reception of the blade, said guard portion being provided with an indentation near the extremity thereof, in combination with a flexible blade engaging the guard portion beneath the binders and having an extended end provided with a lip for engagement with the indentation.

3. In a safety-razor, a holder having a guard portion provided with transversely-disposed binders spaced from the body thereof said binders having transversely-disposed grooves in their under sides and said guard portion being provided with an indentation near the extremity thereof, in combination with a flexible blade provided with longitudinal corrugations, said blade and corrugations engaging the body of the guard portion and the transverse grooves respectively, and said blade being further provided with a lip for engagement with the indentation.

In testimony whereof I affix my signature in presence of two subscribing witnesses.

Frederick H. Arnold.

Witnesses:

Ed. A. Kelly,

M. C. Kreider.